10 Companies Everyone Should Own Stock In

Written by Sam on . Posted in Investing, Retirement. 75424 views.

I don’t like investing in individual companies – they seem to go up when you think they’re doing poorly and go down when you think they’re doing well. Individual companies possess something called “Company-Specific” Risk which means their stock price is susceptible to risks such as lawsuits, management changes and other non-market factors.

While I don’t recommend exposing yourself to company-specific risk, you can decrease the chances of being burnt by individual companies by purchasing proven quality and diversifying.  Here’s a list of 10 Companies that Everyone Should Own Stock In:

  1. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.
  2. Coca-Cola.
  3. International Business Machines Corp.
  4. Chevron Corp.
  5. PepsiCo, Inc.
  6. Procter & Gamble Co
  7. Exxon Mobil Corp
  8. United Technologies.
  9. McDonald’s Corp.
  10. 3M.

Why own each of the above companies?

12 Things Every Investor Should Quit Doing

Written by Sam on . Posted in Investing, Investing for Beginners, Personal Finance, Retirement. 2803 views.

Things Investors Should Quit DoingI’m sorry to tell you, but nature has programmed you to be a bad investor.  It’s true, investing is counter-intuitive.  Your brain wants you to sell when a stock is going down and buy when it’s going up.   Even worse, some of the best investors in the world have learned this fact and actually make money by betting against what retail investors like you are going to do.  Warren Buffet said it best: “Be greedy when others are scared and scared when others are greedy”.

Don’t worry, there’s hope for you.  Here are 12 things you should quit doing when it comes to investing and how to fix them:

  1. Quit chasing sexy investments.  As humans we want to be part of the “In Crowd”.  Whether it’s the latest gossip, the hottest style, or definitely the hottest stock – we want in.  Facebook was a great example of this.  Most retail investors ignored (if they even looked at) the fundamentals and shockingly low earnings to be apart of the hype.  How to fix this:  Simple, if your uncle, co-working or momma, tells you to buy a stock just because they did – get as far away from the stock as you can.  I promise, you’ll hear all about their sexy stock…until the bubble bursts.
  2. Quit buying or selling after it’s too late.   Most of us remember when we had the idea to buy a stock, only to see it go up after we passed on buying it.  Then some of us made the critical mistake of buying it after the move already occurred.  Fight this urge, it’s too late.  How to fix this:  If you’ve missed your opportunity, take note but move onto the next investment.  However, it’s ok to continue to monitor the investment to see if it drops back down to your attractive buying range.
  3. Quit 0wning individual stocks.  Unless you are an employee of the company and involved in their stock purchase/option program, don’t own individual stocks!  Plain out crazy right?  No. Individual company stocks have something called “Diversifiable Risk”, or risk that can be eliminated by diversifying your assets.  Think of a scandal within the company or their key patent expiring.  How to fix this:  Target sectors as a whole.  Say you like ConocoPhillips because you think think energy will go up.  Instead of buying the stock, buy an energy ETF which tracks multiple stocks in that sector (Vanguard Energy ETF, ticker VDE, in this case).
  4. Quit paying too much in fees.  Investing really pays off when your returns start to compound upon the returns you’ve earned the previous years.  Every percentage you pay in fees will result in less of a return, ultimately lessening your compounding effect. How to fix this:  Only pay a fee when you can answer exactly what you’re getting.  Paying a fee to a mutual fund for their expertise in the bond market can be ok.  Paying for a mutual fund which replicates the S&P 500, when you can just buy an ETF which accomplishes the exact same thing, is not ok.  This is one of the 18 Things I Wish Someone Told Me When I Was 18.
  5. Quit being too proud to sell.  This is a common one so pay attention…Just because a stock went down does not mean it is going to come back up.  Pause and ponder this.  I’m not saying to emotionally sell when your investment goes down, I’m saying to recognize when the environment has changed and it’s time to get out.  How to fix this:  If you bet wrong or were hit by an unforeseeable event, cut your losses and move on.  There are plenty of other investments out there, don’t let emotion take influence over your money.

(The First) Two Investments Everyone Should Own

Written by Sam on . Posted in Education, Investing, Investing for Beginners. 4274 views.

The First Two Investments Everyone Should OwnThe following is intended to be a very general financial overview and is meant to whet the appetite of potential/beginning investors.  Learning about investing in it’s simplest form is a great first step to financial independence and saving a boat-load in fees.

Any investor, whether beginner or expert, will typically own two general asset classes:  Stocks and Bonds.  The proportional mix of stocks and bonds is known as one’s Asset Allocation.    Those with less experience should keep a simple asset allocation and start off owning only two things:

  1. A Total Stock Market Index Fund.
  2. A Total Bond Market Index Fund.
To rewind a little, the first rule for beginning investors should be “Don’t own individual stocks”.  Why?  Owning an individual stock exposes you to “Individual or Diversifiable Risk” (the risk of price change due to the unique circumstances of a specific security, as opposed to the total market).  An investor can avoid the risk associated with individual companies (such as the CEO being involved in a scandal) by investing in a Total Stock Market Index Fund which owns thousands of individual companies (decreasing the risk of one company affecting the Fund price).

10 Easy Tricks to an Increased Net Worth in 10 Years

Written by Sam on . Posted in Education, Inspiration, Investing. 5641 views.

Of course it’s easiest to say “make more money and spend less”, but sometimes that’s not possible or even desirable.  Here are 10 tricks to increase your net worth without increasing your income:
  1. Auto-deduct from your paycheck.  It’s not necessarily bad to spend 100% of the paycheck you receive – just make sure your savings are taken out before you get it.  Most employers who allow for direct deposit allow you to specify multiple accounts.  This makes it easy for your living expenses to go into a checking account and a set amount to go directly into a separate savings account.  If this is not an option for you, automatic monthly transfers from checking to savings can also be effective.  $50 a check can add up quickly.  Recommended best-selling read:   The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business, by Charles Duhigg.
  2. Transfer, pay down, then eliminate your debt.  We all know that credit card interest rates are sky high.  If you’ve run up a high balance, consider transferring the balance to a new card (cancelling the old one) to take advantage of the lower, introductory rates.  Follow this up with paying off the balance, then allocating what you were paying in credit card bills to amounts you’re contributing to savings.
  3. Contribute to a Roth IRA account.  Most people do not realize that there is typically NOT a penalty to remove the funds you’ve contributed to a Roth IRA.  Since the government also allows for qualified contributions to be withdrawn for education, housing and medical, why not contribute (get the tax benefits) then withdraw down the road if you need to? See IRS Site for the complete list of qualified distributions*
  4. Pay extra mortgage principal.  A typical new mortgage payment is comprised mostly of interest ($1100 payment can be $960 interest, $140 principal).  An efficient trick is to pay extra principal each month to avoid paying interest on it in the future.  Paying an extra couple hundred bucks per month could allow you to pay your 30 year mortgage off in 15 years.

4 Keys to the New National 3.8% Real Estate Sales Tax

Written by Sam on . Posted in Education, Investing. 1978 views.

An often less talked about portion of the massive legislation known as ObamaCare is how the government is going to pay for it. The great majority of the bill pertains to matters that have nothing to do with healthcare. It may surprise you, but some of the needed revenue will come from the sale of real estate – kind of.

Effective January 1, 2013, a new 3.8% tax on investment income will be imposed. This tax does not affect all real estate transactions, only when certain conditions are met.

Here’s what you need to know from a capital gain/real estate perspective:

  1. Is your AGI greater than $200,000? The 3.8% tax is on the LESSER of your investment income amount or the amount in excess of Adjusted gross income (AGI) over $200,000 (Individual) or $250,000 (Couple). Therefore, if your AGI (which includes real estate sale gains) is less than $200k (or $250k) you are not affected by the new tax.
  2. Your AGI will include the sale of investment income (or real estate). Say you make $100k salary and sell your vacation home for a profit of $225k – your AGI will be $325k and you’ll be subject to the 3.8% tax on $125k ($325k-200k).
  3. You get a $500k deduction for the sale of your primary residence. If you sell your primary residence for a gain of $550k, you get to deduct the first $500k and are left with a gain of $50k to be added to your AGI.